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Texting and cell phone use is an addiction for many people in the United States today. Unfortunately, when driving, it can become a deadly addiction.

How Extensive is the Addition to Texting and Cell Phone Use?

A CNN poll in 2015 revealed that 50 percent of teenagers felt addicted to their cell phones.

In 2017, Pew Research reported that 77 percent of Americans own cellphones. Half of the population own tablet computers.

Today there is even a “Center for Internet and Technology Addiction.”

While people know that texting and driving is dangerous, some people cannot help themselves — they drive and text anyway.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), on the average, people take their attention off the road for five seconds while texting.

Why Are Texting and Cell Phone Use Addicting?

According to Dr. David Greenfield, founder of the Center for Internet and Technology Addiction, cell phone use is neurologically addicting because when you hear from someone, it elevates dopamine, which is pleasurable. This makes people want to keep checking their cellphones for texts and emails. (Huffington Post interview)

How many people have seen a room of people where no one is interacting and almost everyone is on their cell phone, texting or talking? Whenever people have to wait, they tend to pull out their cellphone and check Social Media, emails or text someone. Smart phones fill in the moments when we could relax, think about someone or talk to someone in person.

The truth is, anything at all that takes your attention off the road is detrimental and causes distracted driving. Texting while driving is the worst attention distracter of all, and it is banned in 46 states and the District of Columbia.

Injured by a Distracted Driver?

If a distracted driver caused a vehicle accident that seriously injured you or killed a loved one, seek legal help as soon as possible. Sackstein Sackstein & Lee, LLP has more than 60 years of personal injury experience, and we can protect your rights.